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Brown Vetoes California Hemp Bill, Criticizes Federal Ban

By Phillip Smith October 10, 2011 Brown Vetoes California Hemp Bill, Criticizes Federal Ban
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California Gov. Jerry Brown (D) has vetoed a bill that would have allowed farmers in select counties to grow hemp, saying it would subject them to federal prosecution, but in doing so, he lashed out at the federal ban on hemp farming in the US, calling it “absurd.”

Sponsored by Sen. Mark Leno (D-San Francisco), the bill, Senate Bill 676, would have allowed farmers in four Central California counties to grow industrial hemp for the legal sale of hemp seed, oil, and fiber to manufacturers. The bill specified that hemp must contain less than 0.3% THC, the primary psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, and farmers must submit their crops to testing before it goes to market.

The bill had mandated an eight-year pilot program that would end in 2020, but not before the California attorney general would issue a report on law enforcement impact and the Hemp Industries Association would issue a report on its economic impact.

But although, like three other hemp bills that have been vetoed in California in the past decade, the bill passed the legislature and had the broadest support of any hemp measure considered in the state, Gov. Brown killed it, citing the federal proscription on hemp farming.

“Although I am not signing this measure, I do support a change in federal law. It is absurd that hemp is being imported into the state, but our farmers cannot grow it.”

“Federal law clearly establishes that all cannabis plants, including industrial hemp, are marijuana, which is a federally regulated controlled substance,” Brown said in his veto message. “Failure to obtain a permit from the US Drug Enforcement Administration prior to growing such plants will subject a California farmer to prosecution,” he noted.

“Although I am not signing this measure, I do support a change in federal law,” Brown continued. “Products made from hemp — clothes, food, and bath products — are legally sold in California every day. It is absurd that hemp is being imported into the state, but our farmers cannot grow it.”

Industry groups were not assuaged by Brown’s language criticizing the federal hemp ban. In a press release Monday, Vote Hemp and the Hemp Industries Association blasted the veto.

“Vote Hemp and The Hemp Industries Association are extremely disappointed by Gov. Brown’s veto. This is a big setback for not only the hemp industry — but for farmers, businesses, consumers and the California economy as a whole. Hemp is a versatile cash and rotation crop with steadily rising sales as a natural, renewable food and body care ingredient. It’s a shame that Gov. Brown agreed that the ban on hemp farming was absurd and yet chose to block a broadly supported effort to add California to the growing list of states that are demanding the return of US hemp farming. There truly was overwhelming bipartisan support for this bill,” said Eric Steenstra, president of Vote Hemp and executive director of the HIA.

“After four vetoes in ten years in California, it is clear we lack a governor willing to lead on this important ecological, agricultural and economic issue. We will regroup, strategize and use this veto to our advantage at the federal level,” added Vote Hemp Director and co-counsel Patrick Goggin.

The US hemp market is now estimated to be about $420 million in annual retail sales, but manufacturers must turn to foreign suppliers because the DEA, which refuses to differentiate between industrial hemp and recreational and medical marijuana, bars its cultivation here.

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  • Host Fruend

    What an outrageous reason for a veto. This was only a bill to withdraw criminal penalty under state law, which any state is absolutely allowed to do, regardless of what federal law says. A state is not required to carry a criminal penalty just because federal law carries the penalty. This veto is disingenuous to the state, the legislature, to business, and to the People of California.

  • mahicky

    SO many years of this stupidy, quite sad.