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US Reps, CA AG Chide Feds on Medical Marijuana

By Phillip Smith November 1, 2011 US Reps, CA AG Chide Feds on Medical Marijuana
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The unhappy reaction to the renewed federal offensive against medical marijuana growers and distributors continues to spread, with several members of Congress and California’s attorney general among the latest to voice their displeasure.

Since the Sacramento press conference last month where California’s four US Attorneys announced a crackdown on the medical marijuana using heavy-handed raids on businesses in exemplary compliance with state and local laws and a wave of letters to dispensary landlords threaten property seizure or even criminal prosecution if they don’t throw out their medical marijuana tenants, reaction among medical marijuana supporters, including elected officials, has been growing.

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On Friday, nine members of Congress, led by Reps. Sam Farr (D-CA) and Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA), sent a letter to President Obama expressing “concern with the recent activity by the Department of Justice against legitimate medical marijuana dispensaries in California that are operating legally under state law.” The other congressional signers were Reps. Mike Thompson (D-CA), Jared Polis (D-CO), Pete Stark (D-CA), Steve Cohen (D-TN), Barbara Lee (D-CA), Lynn Woolsey (D-CA), and Bob Filner (D-CA).

Citing “aggressive SWAT-style federal raids in at least seven states,” as well as threats directed at landlords and elected officials, the solons told the president such actions “directly interfere with California’s 15-year-old medical cannabis law by eliminating safe access to medication for the state’s thousands of medical marijuana patients.”

The nine US representatives called on the president to reschedule marijuana as either a Schedule II or Schedule III drug with recognized medicinal uses, either by administrative action or by supporting legislation to achieve that end. A bill that would do just that, HR 1983, the States’ Medical Marijuana Patient Protection Act, has already been filed, they helpfully pointed out.

A week before the congressional letter, California Attorney General Kamala Harris added her voice to the choir of the concerned. “Californians overwhelmingly support the compassionate use of medical marijuana for the ill,” she noted in a statement.

“While there are definite ambiguities in state law that must be resolved either by the state legislature or the courts, an overly broad federal enforcement campaign will make it more difficult for legitimate patients to access physician-recommended medicine in California,” the state’s highest elected law enforcement officer said. “I urge the federal authorities in the state to adhere to the United States Department of Justice’s stated policy and focus their enforcement efforts on ‘significant traffickers of illegal drugs.’”

In mid-October, state Sen. Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) and Assemblyman Tom Ammiano (D-San Francisco), stalwart friends of marijuana law reform, were among the first to speak out against the federal crackdown, followed shortly by fellow San Franciscan state Sen. Leland Yee (D).

“Medical marijuana dispensaries are helping our economy, creating jobs, and most importantly, providing a necessary service for suffering patients,” Lee said in a statement. “There are real issues and real problems that the US Attorney’s Office should be focused on rather than using their limited resources to prosecute legitimate businesses or newspapers. Shutting down state-authorized dispensaries will cost California billions of dollars and unfairly harm thousands of lives.”

In the face of widespread criticism, the US Attorneys have attempted to insulate their boss from the political heat, with a spokesperson making pains to tell the Huffington Post they had coordinated only with the Justice Department, not the Obama administration. But it is ultimately President Obama who is in charge, and who will pay whatever political price is to be paid.

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