Dutch "Weed Pass" Roll-Out Meets Resistance

Dutch "Weed Pass" Roll-Out Meets Resistance

THE NETHERLANDS — A Dutch government policy aimed at barring foreign tourists from buying marijuana in the Netherlands went into effect in three southern border provinces Tuesday, but it didn’t go exactly as authorities planned.

In the southern border city of Maastricht, hundreds of demonstrators filled a central square to protest the move, waving signs saying “Away with the Weed Pass,” “No Discrimination Against Belgians,” and “Dealers Wanted!” and toting a six-foot long joint. Meanwhile, cannabis coffee shop owners across the city closed their doors to protest the imposition of the scheme, leaving the city’s mayor ruffled and pot-buyers to seek out street dealers.

The weed pass plan is the brainchild of the rightist Liberal-Christian Democrat coalition government, which collapsed last month. But the Dutch parliament had already approved the weed pass plan, and it is still scheduled to go into effect nationwide beginning January 1.

Under the weed pass plan, cannabis coffee shops will be forced to become “members only” clubs, with membership limited to 2,000 people per club. Members must register their identities, and only Dutch citizens and residents will be allowed to join the clubs.

Marijuana remains illegal in the Netherlands, but under a policy of pragmatic tolerance in effect since 1976, the Dutch government has allowed for the sale of small amounts of marijuana through the coffee shops. The current lame duck government of Prime Minister Mark Rutte, playing to its conservative base, has moved against the coffee shops as part of a broader anti-drug campaign that has also seen it label hashish a “hard drug” and move to criminalize khat, which is used almost exclusively by the country’s small Somali immigrant population.

The weed pass plan is now in effect in the provinces of Brabant, Limburg, and Zeeland, which border Belgium and/or Germany. Reuters reported that most coffee shops in cities such as Eindhoven, Roermond, and Tilburg were also shut, or were ignoring the weed pass.

“We’ve been selling cannabis to anybody who comes, as normal,” said William Vugs, owner of the ‘t Oermelijn coffee shop in Tilburg. “We are being forced to discriminate against foreigners. They don’t just spend their money here, they buy groceries and fill up their cars, too,” he said.

Vugs said his shop served 800 customers a day, about one-fifth of them from Belgium. Turning them away would have economic consequences beyond the coffee shops, he said.

Vugs is one of the coffee shop owners who hopes to block the weed pass in court by arguing that it is discriminatory. That’s the plan concocted by the Maastricht Coffee Shop Union (VOCM), which announced in a press release Monday that it would challenge the law in court.

“Too much is still unclear about the privacy concerns, but also on the exact requirements of the minister, said VOCM leader Marc Josemans, owner of the Easy Going coffee shop in Maastricht. “Therefore we will not register customers and will continue to sell to anyone aged 18 and older who can identify himself. ”

Instead, in a surprise move, the city’s coffee shops closed their doors—except for Easy Going. Josemans opened long enough to refuse to sell pot to a group of foreigners, who then proceeded to a local police station to file a discrimination complaint. Such complaints will be the basis of the looming legal challenge to the weed pass.

Josemans then stayed open, selling marijuana to anyone who asked for it, and local police arrived shortly.

“The police paid me a visit about a half an hour later and warned me I was violating the new rules, and if I do it again, I’ll be closed down for a month,” he said in a telephone interview with the Associated Press. But he added that he planned to continue selling to all comers and that he expected his shop to be shut down. He would then take his case to the European Court of Justice, he said. “Discrimination is never the right answer,”Joseman said.

Previous efforts to overturn the law, both in the Dutch courts and the European Court of Justice, have failed, but the coffee shop owners and their supporters are determined to try again.

Tuesday also saw competing press conferences in Maastricht, with the mayor and city officials at one and coffee shop supporters at the other, held in front of Easy Going.

Maastricht Mayor Onno Hoes said the city supported the weed pass plan and that the coffee shop owners were “rude” to close their doors. “I did not think the owners would be so cheeky,” he complained. “By doing this, they are hurting the local population.”

But not the street drug dealers, who, according to the VOCM, are flocking to the city to take advantage of the ban on sales to foreigners.

“Maastricht is now faced with drug runners who have never been spotted in the city before, coming from Liege, eastern Europe and northern France,” the group said. “They are using flyers explaining the new rules that were issued by the city of Maastricht in order to lure tourists! Thus we are rapidly returning to a long gone past where a separation of markets for cannabis and hard drugs did not exist and dealers controlled the streets.”

Former head of the Netherlands Police Union Hans van Duijn echoed that sentiment at the press conference in front of Easy Going. “Everyone who is rejected here will walk a few meters down the street to the drug dealers who drive over from Rotterdam, among other places, and ride around in large numbers,” he said.

The primary reasons the Dutch adopted the pragmatic tolerance policy allowing for the coffee shops were to separate “soft” and “hard” drug markets and to reduce the number of street dealers. But it appears the weed pass policy will have the opposite effect.

“This weed pass is a bizarre U-turn by a government of moralistic politicians looking for ways to score points among the conservative part of the nation,” said Joep Oomen, director of the European Coalition for Just and Effective Drug Policies (ENCOD) from his home next door in Belgium. “It is a slap in the face of the millions of non-Dutch residents who visit the coffee shops every year without ever causing any nuisance, as well as of Dutch society as a whole, that will now be faced with an increasing illegal cannabis circuit.”

Oomen noted that street dealers in Maastricht Tuesday were openly defying authorities by giving interviews on Dutch TV.

“Nobody expects that people looking for good quality cannabis will now cease to do that,” he continued. “They will just not be allowed in the coffee shops anymore and will instead find their stuff on the streets.”

For ENCOD, the weed pass plan is a repressive last gasp that could have unintended consequences, good as well as bad.

“We consider this as a last convulsion of a dying body,” Oomen said. “The problems that this effort to end the coffee shop model will create will cause the Dutch public to see that the only real solution is to regulate the ‘back door’ of the coffee shops.”

Oomen was referring to the peculiarity in the current Dutch system which allows for marijuana to be sold, but does not allow for a legal supply for the coffee shops. That has resulted in increasing black market pot production.

The issue of the “back door” was also on Joseman’s mind.

“Let’s forget this right wing hobby and focus on the real problem—the ‘back door,'” he said. “This is the Achilles heel of Dutch cannabis policy. When we finally start to regulate the cultivation of cannabis and supply to the coffee shops, we will kill three birds with one stone: significantly less crime, huge profits for public health, and one billion euros a year extra in the national treasury.”

But first, the coffee shops have to deal with their current “front door” problem. The looming court cases are one avenue, but the September elections set to replace the current government provide another one.

“Our hope is on the outcome of the trial processes that have started today in Maastricht and Tilburg by the closure of the coffee shops that refuse to carry out the new measure, and on the general elections in September,” said Oomen. “Predictions are that at least two of the five left-wing parties that are currently in opposition will participate in the next government, and they will cancel the new measures or at least diminish their impact.”

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