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Civil Rights Veteran Randy Credico Running for Mayor of New York City

By Phillip Smith February 6, 2013 Civil Rights Veteran Randy Credico Running for Mayor of New York City
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NEW YORK, NY — New York City has earned itself the sobriquet of Marijuana Arrest Capital of the World, with tens of thousands of minor pot possession arrests every year — mostly of young men of color — generated in good part by the city’s equally infamous stop-and-frisk policing, again aimed primarily at the city’s young and non-white residents.

There’s a man running an outsider campaign for the mayor’s office there this year who wants to end all that.

Veteran Big Apple civil rights, social justice, Occupy Wall Street (OWS), and drug reform activist Randy Credico, who also doubles as a professional comedian, is mounting an insurgent campaign for the Democratic Party mayoral nomination, and he wants to end the city’s drug war and a whole lot more, and he wants to do it now.

The inventively funny, yet deadly serious, agitprop artist has an ambitious 17-point program for his first day in office, with promises that range from going after “the biggest criminals in our city” — the Wall Street bankers — and reforming the city’s tax code to favor the poor to rolling back privatization of city schools and reforming various city agencies.

But just beneath banksters and taxes is a vow to begin reining in the NYPD by firing Police Commissioner Ray Kelly (to be replaced with Frank Serpico) and “abolishing the NYPD’s unconstitutional policies of racial profiling, stop and frisk, domestic spying, entrapment, and its infamous (albeit unadmitted) ‘quota system.’”

Central to that policing reform plank, Credico says, is reclassifying the smoking and carrying of marijuana as no longer an arrestable offense. He also vows to fire any officer who lies or perjures himself on the stand, and to bar the use of “no-knock” warrants and stun grenades “except in the case of legitimate terrorist attack.”

And he wants to replace the city’s Special Narcotics Office with a Harm Reduction Office, whose leadership he has offered to Drug Policy Alliance head Ethan Nadelmann. He also vows to shut down the Rikers Island prison and turn it into a treatment center and education facility with a state of the art library, and to nominate law professor Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Color-blindness, to run it.

That’s quite a tall order for a first day in office, but Credico says he’s up for it.

“I plan to stay up for 24 hours and get all that stuff done,” he told the Chronic.

Of course, first he has to win the Democratic Party nomination and then win the general election, and that’s a pretty tall order, too. There is a long list of candidates  running for a shot at the prestigious post, and he is facing stiff establishment opposition in the primary, most notably from Public Advocate Bill de Blasio and the as yet officially undeclared city council Speaker Christine Quinn, who leads the other Democrats in early polls, but is in a close race with “undecided.”

The Republican race includes a handful of announced or potential candidates led by former Metropolitan Transit Authority head Joseph Lhota (who still trails “undecided” by a large margin) and NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly, who is as yet unannounced.

The Libertarians may also field a candidate this year, possibly former “Manhattan madam” and gubernatorial candidate Kristin Davis, and we can’t forget the Rent Is Too Damn High Party, either.

“The GOP has a rich guy who just jumped in, and the Democrats have a six-pack of hacks, all getting money from the real estate interests and Wall Street and none of whom will talk about the issues,” Credico explained. “The Democrats are all doing the Schumer act — just talking about the middle class, not the poor, the homeless, the division between the rich and poor, not about drug policy. This city is virtually a police state right now.”

Credico has a remedy for that: Elect him.

“I will get rid of Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, who is a combination of J. Edgar Hoover and Joseph Fouche, Napoleon’s dreaded head of the secret police. Everyone is afraid of him. He’s got the Red Squads going; they were infiltrating groups at Occupy Wall Street. Kelly is doing all these joint operations with the feds under the guise of fighting terrorism, and this city is crawling with undercover cops — FBI, DEA, AFT, all running joint task forces with the NYPD. They’ve foiled 14 plots, all hatched by the NYPD. Ray Kelly has way too much power,” the veteran activist said flatly.

“There is a lot of money not only in the prison industrial complex, but also the police industrial complex,” Credico noted. “They have asset forfeiture and lots of new schemes, tons of undercover agents, who are really there to beat up on the black community. They infiltrate, demonize, and destroy lives, and this has to stop.”

Credico has been active in the Occupy Wall Street moving, having been arrested five times by the NYPD, but before that, he was active in the city’s minority communities for years, working to reform the Rockefeller drug laws with the William Moses Kunstler Fund for Racial Justice (in between stints flying out to Tulia, Texas, to deal with the bogus mass arrests of black men on drug charges there), and fighting stop-and-frisk. He currently is taking time out of his days to attend hearings in the criminal trial of the NYPD officer who shot and killed unarmed 18-year-old Ramarley Graham in his own bathroom as he was flushing a bag of weed down the toilet.

“I go to every one of the court dates and sit right next to his mother,” he said. “This cop invaded Ramarley’s house and shot him in the head for weed, but it’s not an isolated incident. No cops go to jail for killing a black person, but a spit on a cop and you can go to jail for years. This is just one cop — and he’s like the Lt. Calley of the NYPD. [Editor's Note: Calley was the sole US Army officer convicted of a crime in the Vietnam War My Lai massacre.] It’s not an isolated incident; it’s the policy, the same policy that killed Ramarley Graham and Sean Bell and Amador Diallou. So many people have been killed by the NYPD, and it’s not just the guys on the street; it’s a brutal force.”

Marijuana could also be a wedge issue for him, Credico said.

“I’m a committed pot smoker, and I think it should be legal, and I’m the only candidate saying it should be legal. Of course, it’s up to the state legislature to do that, but I would direct the NYPD not to enforce those laws and particularly not to arrest anyone.”

Under current state law, pot possession is decriminalized, but beginning with Mayor Rudy Giuliani, the NYPD had a policy of turning what should have been tickets for possession into misdemeanors by either reaching in someone’s pocket and removing the baggie or intimidating the person into revealing it himself, thus elevating the offense from an infraction to the misdemeanor of “public possession.” Under increasing pressure over the tactic, Commissioner Kelly last year issued an order for it to stop, and arrests have declined somewhat, but still remain at unacceptably high levels.

In 2011, there were some 50,000 marijuana possession arrests in the city, nearly 80% of them of people of color. Nearly one-quarter (12,000) were youth aged 16 to 19, and of those, 94% had no prior criminal records.

And it’s not just marijuana, Credico said.

“There should be no more prosecutions for drug possession,” he said. “They should be going after the real criminals, the guys on Wall Street. They don’t have to go up to Harlem and Washington Heights, the real big barracudas are right down here.”

The city’s criminal justice system is rotten to the core, he said.

“This is like Tulia, this is like the South,” he moaned. “The criminal justice system here is a black box where blacks and Latinos go in and disappear into the penal system. The cops are white, the judges are white, the prosecutors are white — only the Bronx has a rainbow coalition of prosecutors — the rest are white, and they’re going after black people in this city.”

Many of those busted ended up in Rikers Island or the Tombs, often after first spending hours or days crammed into precinct holding cells.

“Rikers Island is like Alcatraz for poor people on minor drug offenses,” said Credico. “It’s all Mickey Mouse; there’s no Hannibal Lectors there. They need to turn it into a university for poor people. And no one is talking about the Tombs. I’ve been there. There are lots of junkies in there going through withdrawals, filthy toilets, people penned in like cattle. No one will talk about that, or about the hundreds of precincts with their holding cells.”

Unsurprisingly, Credico doesn’t think much of his establishment opposition.

“Christine Quinn is Bloomberg in drag wearing a red wig,” he declared, “and de Blasio supported stop-and-frisk. He was also Hillary’s hit man when she was running for the Senate, and derailed Grandpa Munster Al Lewis’s campaign then.”

Lhota, who has recently made noises about legalizing marijuana, “looks like a weed head,” Credico snorted. “But I actually smoke it.”

Now, Credico has to go through the process of qualifying as a Democratic candidate, smiting his foes within the party, and then taking on the Republican challenger in the general election. His first official campaign task will be to complete a month-long signature-gathering drive in late spring to qualify for the primary.

“I’ll be on talk shows — people all over the place are asking for interviews — making some ads and some YouTube videos, and they’ll be interesting and funny. It will be a very entertaining campaign. We have buttons coming out soon, we have the web site, there are people who will be putting ads in the Nation,” he explained.

“Drug reformers are interested in my campaign, and I’ve got tons of volunteers from the stop-and-frisk campaigns and people from OWS,” he said. “I’m getting a lot of attention right now.”

Credico, of course, is a long-shot, but even if he doesn’t become the next mayor of New York, to the degree that his campaign shines a light on the problems in the city’s criminal justice system and forces other candidates to address them, he will be judged a success.

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