Poll: Most Americans Want Marijuana Legalized

Poll: Most Americans Want Marijuana Legalized

72% Say the Federal Government’s Efforts Against Marijuana "Cost More Than They are Worth"

For the first time since they began polling the question four decades ago, Pew Research Polling has released new survey data that reveals 52% of Americans want marijuana to be legalized. Only 45% were opposed.

This support is spread across demographics. The Baby Boomers (50%), Generation X (54%), and Millenials (65%) all have majority support for legalization. The only age demographic that remains opposed is the Silent Generation, those born before 1942, though support in this age group has also significantly increased. 32% of this age group now support legalization, up from 17% in 2002.

According to this polling data, most Americans have also tried marijuana personally. 48% of respondents answered affirmatively when asked if they consume marijuana, up from 38% about a decade ago.

Not only are Americans becoming more supportive of legalization, but there has been a dramatic change in how Americans view marijuana use. In 2006, Pew Research found that 50% of Americans believed smoking marijuana was “morally wrong” and only 35% did not think it was a moral issue. Today these numbers have completely flipped, 50% of Americans responded in this latest survey that using marijuana is not a moral issue and only 32% stated it was morally wrong.

60% of Americans across all political orientations also believe the federal government should not enforce federal marijuana laws in states that legalize it. 57% of Republicans, 59% of Democrats, and 64% of Independents believe the federal government should leave states like Washington and Colorado alone.

Majorities of Americans no longer consider marijuana consumption immoral, nor do they consider marijuana to represent a “gateway” to other illicit substances. Moreover, a super-majority of respondents — 72% — say the federal government’s efforts against marijuana “cost more than they are worth.”

“I’ve always tended to be cautious in claiming that we’ve hit the ‘tipping point’ on marijuana legalization,” said Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance. “But we’re there now. And I’d say we’re trailing marriage equality by just a half-step, even if far fewer elected officials are willing to join publicly with us as yet.”

You can view the full results of this survey here.

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